Examples of Opt-in, Permission-based marketing

Opt-in means asking the user for permission before using their personal data for marketing or other purposes. This method of getting the user’s permission is considered as more respectful of user’s privacy than opt-out.

For example, registering for an email newsletter is an example of opt-in, as you are giving permission for the company to include you in their mailing list.

Another example of opt-in, permission-based marketing is when you log in to a web site using your Facebook account. The app will ask you for permission to access your data, and you opt-in by proceeding with the log-in process. You also have the option to cancel in case you don’t wish to opt-in.

Session 10: Online Privacy Tools

Part I. What Information Do Advertisers See About You ?

You can see the anonymous profile that third-party data creators have built about you based on your behavior and surfing habits at BlueKai’s Registry. Launched in September 2008, BlueKai is a  data exchange which aggregates user information based on cookies, I.P. addresses (e.g. your computer’s address on the Internet), and publisher-owned information.

Here’s a snippet of my profile as shown on BlueKai’s Registry:

BlueKai also lets you opt-out through its BlueKai Registry. Opt-out means you inform BlueKai that you do not wish your profile to be traded on their data exchange, and you also want to stop more data from being added to your profile.

Part II. PrivacyChoice

PrivacyChoice provides browser plug-ins that can show you the privacy scores of web sites that you’re visiting. These plug-ins can also show all cookies and trackers that are currently on your machine, among other things.

For example, I typed in Facebook’s URL to check its privacy score.

Checking a Site's Privacy Score

And here’s the result I get.

Facebook's Score on Privacychoice.org

Part III. Opting out of Behavioral Advertising

Go to google.com/ads/preferences to disable the Google cookie that stores your interest related information.

Yahoo lets you opt-out of targeted advertising at http://info.yahoo.com/privacy/us/yahoo/opt_out/targeting/details.html.

You can also opt-out of online behavioral advertising from multiple advertising networks through the opt-out page at the Self-Regulatory Program for Online Behavioral Advertising web site. For example, here are the advertising networks who belong to the self-regulatory program whose behavioral advertising program I can opt-out of on my computer’s browser.

Session 10: Behavioral or Targeted Advertising

Some of the ads you receive on Web pages are customized based on predictions about your interests generated from your visits over time and across different Web sites. This type of ad customization — sometimes called “online behavioral” or “interest-based” advertising — is enabled through your computer browser and browser cookies.

This video explains how behavioral advertising works on advertising networks such as Yahoo, Google and MSN.

Session 9: Using an online geographic information system (GIS) to support marketing decisions

Try ESRI’s online GIS to see how marketers may find out more about customer demographics tied to a specific location.

On the right-hand side, you’ll see a box titled “Who’s In Your Neighborhood”. Enter the ZIP code (e.g. 07310, 90310, 70114) to see what information you can get about customers living in these areas.

Based on what you’ve seen, what types of marketing decisions maybe supported by a GIS ?